animation skills

We often get emails and CVs from motion designers who are dying to work with us.
Some of them are just beginners, however, we currently do not have the time to invest in their development. Therefore have no other choice, but to send their request back to their side of the table for now.

The most stubborn job seekers do not give up and are looking for feedback:

  • “Why am I not a good fit?”
  • “What do I need to know, so that you hire me?”
  • “Which skills are important to become a good asset?”
  • “What is wrong with me?” =)

We have discussed these inquiries with our colleagues from other motion design studios and have decided to share our piece of mind.

The 3 most wanted animation skills that motion design studios are looking and hiring for:

First of all, keep calm and keep editing.
It may sound simple, but it is not as easy to accomplish as it may seem. A great animation designer is ready to edit his work sometimes even 10 times while keeping his head cool. Emotional self-control and effective conflict resolutions technique will be a plus. One should not lose their head over a new round of comments from the art-director (Hashtag joking not joking)
By the way, we recommend a recent article “Quantity Beats Quality” by Chris Do with interesting thoughts about this topic.

Frame-by-frame cel animation

If you have enough experience in frame-by-frame cel animation you will reach
a point when you will no longer be pursuing careers in companies, they will be following you!
Cel animation is a motion technique that comprises hundreds of 2D frames of
the same frame in slightly different poses. It is an extremely time-consuming
and labor-intensive process. Our vision perceives 24 frames for a second, therefore needing 24 different poses for just one single second. Additionally,
the artist needs to understand how to mimics hand-drawn characters and environments. Developing own unique art style often surprises the employer. Knowing how to impress the client and wows viewers is what a great asset
knows how to do. Cel shading, when done well, features the charm and warmth of a hand-crafted and tactile artwork
Nonetheless, based on many hours of practice, the animator gains experience and clearer understanding of animation processes. So, if creating a frame-by-frame cel animation is still a quest for you, keep going: practice makes perfect. You will get there.

After Effects character animation

There is space reserved for people in heaven who know how to make proper smooth movements character animation without any lags, or glitches; at a correct speed; looking realistically.

When you accidentally mess up your walk animation pic.twitter.com/Rg7TOJNSqC

— jpjambert (@jpjambert) May 7, 2018

Proper timing for animation skills

People who have a good sense of timing and can implement interesting transitions between the scenes are also valued.

Overall, in visual business, some things are highly valued just because they are unnoticed by the naked eye. Invisible service is the reflection of great service. People appreciate appealing elements and are pleasant to watch. Most of them may look simple, but in reality are hard to conduct, taking up to several full working days for a 3-second wow-effect.


Q&A from youtube:

Kay Mey: Hi, I am a beginner in animation, but already have a little experience. I have innovative ideas which I am trying to implement in my works, but the studios and clients do not understand my approach. I feel like I am losing my creative potential by not practicing on my own style. How can i keep doing what I love, but not too much restrained by the thinking inside the box views?

XPLAI: You can start by spending half of your time on real (“boring”) business tasks that are in demand and that clients are happy to pay for and the other
half of your time experimenting and trying new things. Constantly publish your personal works, and if this is what the market really needs, one day you will notice it.

Bernard Archibald: I feel like I have the necessary skills, I worked as a freelancer on several 2D projects for over 2 years now, but the studios still do not hire me. Is there anything then the animation skills that i need to consider when working with a studio? Thanks!

XPLAI: Sometimes it could be useful to ask a direct question to the recruiter /
or another contact person in a company where you are trying to apply for a job.
I would be very grateful if you could give me short, but 100% honest feedback about why I was not suitable for the position. This is so I know what I should improve in the future. Thank you in advance for your time.

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